Researchers Develops Imaging Method Helps Water Decontamination

Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - 16:06

Cornell University researchers in cooperation with an Iranian scientist developed a new imaging method that promises in decontaminating water by yielding surprising and important information about catalyst particles that can’t be obtained any other way.

According to the university official website, Peng Chen, the Peter J.W. Debye Professor of Chemistry, has developed a method that can image nonfluorescent catalytic reactions – reactions that don’t emit light – on nanoscale particles.

This new method can image reactions that produce light, but that applies only to a small fraction of reactions, making the new technique potentially significant in fields ranging from materials engineering to nanotechnology and energy sciences.

In the paper, the researchers applied the new technique to image the oxidation of hydroquinone, a micropollutant found in water, on bismuth vanadate catalyst particles, and discovered previously unknown behaviors of catalysts that helped render hydroquinone nontoxic.

The technique they discovered relies on competition between fluorescent and nonfluorescent reactions. The competition suppresses the fluorescent reaction, allowing it to be measured and mapped, which in turn provides information about the nonfluorescent reaction.

Co-authors include research associate Chunming Li, former postdoctoral researcher Madhi Hesari and Ningmu Zou, Ph.D. ’17. The research was partly supported by the Army Research Office and the U.S. Department of Energy, and made use of the Cornell Center for Materials Research, which is supported by the National Science Foundation.

Opinions


Popular News

Latest News