Researchers Find Out Whole Body Vibration Reduces Inflammation in Diabetes

Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 14:34

Researchers at the Medical College of Georgia and Dental College of Georgia at Augusta University have found out that whole body vibration appears to improve how well our body uses glucose as an energy source and adjust microbiome and immune cells to deter inflammation.

According to the Eurekalert, researchers have described how regular use of whole body vibration can create this healthier mix by yielding a greater percentage of macrophages, cells that can both promote or prevent inflammation, that suppress rather than promote.

Researchers report in International Journal of Molecular Sciences that changes they saw in their mouse model included increasing levels of a bacterium that makes short chain fatty acids, which can help the body better utilize glucose. Glucose is used by the body for fuel but at high levels promotes inflammation, insulin insensitivity and ultimately can cause diabetes.

While there were other changes, the most dramatic they documented was the 17-fold increase in this bacterium called Alistipes, a gut bacterium not typically in high supply there but known to be proficient at making short chain fatty acids which, in turn, are "very good" at decreasing inflammation in the gut, says Dr. Jack Yu, chief of pediatric plastic surgery at MCG.

Alistipes, which helps ferment our food without producing alcohol, generally improves the metabolic status of our gut and makes us more proficient at using the glucose we consume for energy.

When they saw this, co-corresponding authors Yu and Dr. Babak Baban, immunologist and interim associate dean for research at DCG, immediately thought that giving a dose of the bacterium, like you would a medication, with a smaller dose of whole body vibration, in this case 10 minutes versus 20 minutes five times weekly, might work just as well, and it did, they report.

It what appears to be this good chain reaction, when Alistipes went up, glucose use and the macrophage mix also improved, Baban says. "The sequencing is not yet completely clear," Yu says, "But it appears to be a closed loop, feed forward, self-magnifying cycle."

Our microbiome, like a casserole, is in layers and one way whole body vibration may work is by rearranging those layers, Baban says, but they reiterate that no one is certain just how whole body vibration works in this or other scenarios, like as an exercise mimic without all the proactive movement.

But it appears to help address a key concern in diabetes and many common diseases: inflammation. While acute inflammation helps us fight disease, chronic inflammation helps start and sustain a variety of diseases from cardiovascular problems to cancer as well as diabetes.

With rates of inflammation-producing obesity and related type 2 diabetes increasing, even in children, new therapies that can directly help avoid the health consequences are needed, they write. They add that while more work is needed, whole body vibration might be one widely applicable and generally safe approach to use.

Macrophages, which promote inflammation, called M1, and suppress inflammation, called M2, play an important role in regulation of the inflammatory response. The inflammatory status of macrophages also influences the gut microbiome and vice versa.

In diabetes, whole body vibration is known to reduce ill effects like excessive urine production and excessive thirst, Yu reported in 2012 to the Third World Congress of Plastic Surgeons of Chinese Descent. That work was in a mouse model, which mimicked overeating adolescents.

Vibration also reduced inflammation levels, including shifts in some immune cell levels. Vibration also was better than drugs at reducing A1C levels, which provide a better idea of your average blood sugar levels than a fasting glucose by showing what percentage of your oxygen-carrying hemoglobin is routinely coated with sugar. High glucose, or blood sugar levels, may result in sugar binding to cells and other places inside the body where it can alter function.

Opinions


Popular News

Latest News